Project: IssueHunt Statistics

To keep up with advances with technology, one activity that software engineers often do is contribute to Open Source.  I'll be restricting this to only contributing to other existing projects, not your own projects.

However, there are some obstacles when contributing:

  • Since many tools used in the community are Open Source, there are very strict standards that must be followed.  Thus, the process of contributing for existing projects can be quite a headache.
  • If a project is small and the owner isn't active on a regular basis, it can be hard for your work to be merged into the project.
  • Some project communities can be toxic.  The Linux kernel community has experienced a lot of toxicity from Linus Torvalds, the Linux founder.
  • Many professional software engineers have non-competing agreements that forbid them from programming in their free times.  Those that don't have other commitments.
  • If you're not getting paid to contribute during working hours, why bother?

Some would see not contributing to Open Source as selfish.  After all, you get to use free tools and you should be grateful.  I honestly don't like this line of thinking.  Not everyone wants to spend their entire time programming.  Some projects have contributing policies that are a hassle to deal with.  Some would like to do a side hustle and earn extra money.

Fortunately, there a couple websites that focus on earning money while contributing to Open Source.  I ran across a few different sites:

  • IssueHunt - I noticed that this site mainly focuses on web projects.  If you want to contribute, I recommend having a background with Javascript and Typescript.
  • BountySource - Has a much more active user base with more variety.
  • Gitcoin - The tasks on this site focuses more on Blockchain.  You can be rewarded with Ethereum as well as cash.

For this post, I'll be mainly focusing on IssueHunt.

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